October72013
September172013
September162013
August222013
“Ever since the computers came to be ruling things pretty much their own way, handling data and forming conclusions, the only way a man could achieve any notice in the galaxy was to do some original thinking —and by original, read alogical. […] Men, luckily, aren’t limited to the flip-flop on-off type of binary thinking that the computers specialize in.” "Solitary" by Robert Silverberg, from the collection Godling Go Home! (1964)
August182013
10AM

Martian Time Slip by Phillip K. Dick

beyondmetaphors:

I’ve been meaning to write about this book ever since I put it down. And as always, time and other things get in the way. But right now I’m on a six hour drive to Philidelphia and have a belly full of soft pretzel, so here we go.

Martian Time Slip is my favorite book of Dick’s and quite possibly all time. Though it doesn’t seem to get anywhere near as much credit as Do Androids Dream…, or any of his movie adapted works. Which might be due to the structure of the story, or lack thereof.

Set in the early stages of a developing Martian colony, the book revolves around a repair man recovering from a schizophrenic breakdown. The focus on schizophrenia and how it effects your perceived reality is what really makes the book interesting, and sometimes a little confusing.

It’s almost like a Seinfeld episode, how all the subplots that seem to be entirely unrelated somehow, slowly come together at the end to tie your brain up in a pretzel knot of confusion.

Arnie Kott, the Al Pacino of the Martian colony, takes Jack the repair man under his wing. With the help of an institutionalized child that sees the world in fast forward and some martian natives, Arnie and Jack try to tap into the the child’s mind.

Dick’s description of the martian landscape and the inner workings of the colony are fantastic. Joined with the dialoge and character development, you feel as if its happening to you.

Martian Time Slip is not just another Sci-fi jerk fest though. With plenty of boner inducing sex scenes that could rock the pants off your bed ridden grandmother and suspense that makes even the hardest of criminals become giddy with anticipation, it’s hard to not love this book.

The thing about Martian Time Slip is that everytime I put the book down, reality comes back. And who would ever want that?

-Tommy

August132013
August92013

craigfernandez:

TIERS!

Philip Jose Farmer’s “The World of Tiers” series (minus “Red Orc’s Rage”).

Good clean American fun.

August12013
bunnyonplanetq:

Brain Wave by Poul Anderson, cover by Michael Herring, 1978.

bunnyonplanetq:

Brain Wave by Poul Anderson, cover by Michael Herring, 1978.

(Source: flickr.com, via fuckyeahsciencefiction)

July302013
The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick (2011)
edited by Pamela Jackson and Jonathan Lethem

Dick started the journal after his visionary experiences in February and March 1974, which he called “2-3-74.” These visions began shortly after Dick had impacted wisdom teeth removed. When a delivery person from the pharmacy brought his pain medication, he noticed the ichthys necklace she wore and asked her what it meant. She responded that it was a symbol used by the early Christians, and in that moment Dick’s religious experiences began.
[…]
In the following weeks, Dick experienced further visions, including a hallucinatory slideshow of abstract patterns and an information-rich beam of pink light. In the Exegesis, he theorized as to the origins and meaning of these experiences, frequently concluding that they were religious in nature. The being that originated the experiences is referred to by several names, including Zebra, God, and the Vast Active Living Intelligence System. From 1974 until his death in 1982, Dick wrote the Exegesis by hand in late-night writing sessions, sometimes composing as many as 150 pages in a sitting. In total, it consists of approximately 8,000 pages of notes, only a small portion of which have been published.
Besides the Exegesis, Dick described his visions and faith in numerous other works, including VALIS, Radio Free Albemuth, The Divine Invasion, The Transmigration of Timothy Archer, one brief passage in A Scanner Darkly, and the uncompleted The Owl in Daylight, as well as many essays and personal letters. In Pursuit of Valis: Selections From the Exegesis was published in 1991.
-from wikipedia

 

“This book is a relatively narrow selection of pages from that effort. It reads like a philosophical journal, and consists of outlines, correspondence, doodles and rambling essays on science, creativity, ancient history, religion, death, and drugs. This is the raw ore of genius, but it is extremely unrefined. Worse, it has an eerie “tinfoil hat” feel to it; one gets the strong sense that Dick was flirting with mental illness. The casual reader is certain to be alienated, and unnecessarily, since the Exegesis formed the basis for several excellent works of narrative fiction. VALIS, Dick’s crypto-autobiographical novel recounting the same events is infinitely more accessible.” - excerpted from Amazon.com reviewer The Dilettante

The Exegesis of Philip K. Dick (2011)

edited by Pamela Jackson and Jonathan Lethem

Dick started the journal after his visionary experiences in February and March 1974, which he called “2-3-74.” These visions began shortly after Dick had impacted wisdom teeth removed. When a delivery person from the pharmacy brought his pain medication, he noticed the ichthys necklace she wore and asked her what it meant. She responded that it was a symbol used by the early Christians, and in that moment Dick’s religious experiences began.

[…]

In the following weeks, Dick experienced further visions, including a hallucinatory slideshow of abstract patterns and an information-rich beam of pink light. In the Exegesis, he theorized as to the origins and meaning of these experiences, frequently concluding that they were religious in nature. The being that originated the experiences is referred to by several names, including Zebra, God, and the Vast Active Living Intelligence System. From 1974 until his death in 1982, Dick wrote the Exegesis by hand in late-night writing sessions, sometimes composing as many as 150 pages in a sitting. In total, it consists of approximately 8,000 pages of notes, only a small portion of which have been published.

Besides the Exegesis, Dick described his visions and faith in numerous other works, including VALIS, Radio Free Albemuth, The Divine Invasion, The Transmigration of Timothy Archer, one brief passage in A Scanner Darkly, and the uncompleted The Owl in Daylight, as well as many essays and personal letters. In Pursuit of Valis: Selections From the Exegesis was published in 1991.

-from wikipedia

 

This book is a relatively narrow selection of pages from that effort. It reads like a philosophical journal, and consists of outlines, correspondence, doodles and rambling essays on science, creativity, ancient history, religion, death, and drugs. This is the raw ore of genius, but it is extremely unrefined. Worse, it has an eerie “tinfoil hat” feel to it; one gets the strong sense that Dick was flirting with mental illness. The casual reader is certain to be alienated, and unnecessarily, since the Exegesis formed the basis for several excellent works of narrative fiction. VALIS, Dick’s crypto-autobiographical novel recounting the same events is infinitely more accessible.” - excerpted from Amazon.com reviewer The Dilettante

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