August192014

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Inside The Infinite 3D Beauty Of Sci-Fi Fractal Landscapes

Using software program Mandelbulb3D, the artist Mark J. Brady (aka Mark Jay Bee) makes fractal landscapes that look like computerized storyboards from Ridley Scott movies— but the difference is that these vast digital settings are comprised of infinitely repeating patterns, bringing viewers into an inter-dimensional space that goes way beyond the 2D fractals we’re used to.

Via The Creators Project

(via fuckyeahsciencefiction)

August182014

Anonymous said: A few years back, like around three years maybe, I read about a book that had floating islands and the main character was a shapeshifter that turned into some reptilian humanoid that had wings. Can't find that book anywhere. Any ideas?

Raksura?

Any other ideas?

12PM

War Surf (2005) by M. M. Buckner

What would you do if you were rich, bright, vigorous, virtually immortal—and nearly bored to death? You’d invent a thrill sport… It’s the 23rd century and Nasir Deepra is 248 years old, wealthy, kept young by all-pervasive nanotechnology, a corporate executive and bored with life. To spice things up he has become an Agonist, dipping into war zones—many of them in satellites orbiting the Earth—and filming his daredevil antics. Agonists have a large fan-base who watch them on the Net and they revel in the attention. A war surf goes badly and the Agonists lose their top ranking amongst surfers, so they decide to up the ante and go to Heaven, a class 10 difficulty war zone, the toughest, in order to get back on top. Nasir is reluctant to go since he’s on the board of directors that controls Heaven and he knows why it’s a class 10. His younger girlfriend, Sheeba, talks him into it and disaster strikes: Nasir and Sheeba are captured by workers who control Heaven. Nasir has to come to terms with the brutal exploitation he has been a part of and avoid the “disease” that runs rampant amongst Heaven’s workers. - from Amazon.com

August172014
70sscifiart:

Here’s a good read. The former editorial director of Omni, Ben Bova, talks about the magazine’s inception: OMNI Magazine Pioneer Ben Bova on Science Fiction, Art, & the OMNI Culture. It’s the foreword from the recent art collection The Mind’s Eye: The Art of Omni.
Best part: Omni's original name, Nova, and how this dissuaded Ben from joining, so as not to be known as “Bova from Nova.”
[Omni Reboot]

Check out the rest of the above blog too. Good stuff.

70sscifiart:

Here’s a good read. The former editorial director of Omni, Ben Bova, talks about the magazine’s inception: OMNI Magazine Pioneer Ben Bova on Science Fiction, Art, & the OMNI Culture. It’s the foreword from the recent art collection The Mind’s Eye: The Art of Omni.

Best part: Omni's original name, Nova, and how this dissuaded Ben from joining, so as not to be known as “Bova from Nova.”

[Omni Reboot]

Check out the rest of the above blog too. Good stuff.

11AM
70sscifiart:

Alex Schomburg

70sscifiart:

Alex Schomburg

(via scificovers)

August162014
August152014
9AM
August142014

Anonymous said: I read a three part book several years (more that 20) ago that had to do with a Colonization ship moving through space. The main thing I remember about it was that on a planet they stopped at, one of the crew brought back an organism/virus that "ate" body heat. As it spread through the ship, they tried to warm the victims, causing the visus/organism to grow. Finally they tried to cool the infected off, which stopped the outbreak... That's all I remember... any help?

anyone have any ideas?

August132014

planclops23 said: I am in charge of a creative writing club at my university and I received overwhelming requests to do a segment on how to write science fiction. What would you suggest is essential to science fiction writing and which authors do you think provide the best insight?

I enjoyed 

How to Write Tales of Horror, Fantasy and Science Fiction 
by J. N. Williamson (Editor)

and

Zen in the Art of Writing: Essays on Creativity 
by Ray Bradbury

The former is a set of blurbs by several different authors, and the latter is more about writing in general rather than writing SF.

Stephen King has 3 good technique books - Danse Macabre, On Writing, and Secret Windows, all of which have good writing insights that can easily apply to SF.

Orson Scott Card has a couple of books which I have not read.

  • How to Write Science Fiction & Fantasy
  • Elements of Fiction Writing - Characters & Viewpoint

Nancy Kress also has a book titled Elements of Fiction Writing - Beginnings, Middles & Ends 

I would look at some of the more popular/foundational writers short stories.

  • Isaac Asimov
  • Arthur C. Clarke
  • Ray Bradbury
  • Ursula K. Leguin

Commenters will reveal more.

My favorite SF stories are those that have such a solidly built world that your imagination races to fill in gaps and concoct micro narratives in between the lines for the universe. Remember science fiction is speaking more about today than it is about tomorrow so I would build my metaphor before I built my world.

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