September172014
September162014
September152014
Wildlife (1995)
by James Patrick Kelly

The last great cyberpunk science fiction novel, James Patrick Kelly’s “Wildlife” is a compelling, memorable, exploration into the future of computers and biotechnology and its unforeseen impact on humanity. Covering three generations of the Wynne family, “Wildlife” still seems prophetic in its fictional coverage of biotechnology and artificial intelligence, in a dark, nightmarish future far more realistic than anything I have read in recently-published post-cyberpunk novels. Kelly’s Wynne Edwards is one of cyberpunk’s most fascinating protagonists; the product of an odd experiment conducted by her father, Tony Cage, the most famous and wealthiest designer drug artist. She must contend with the unexpected future shaped by the release of the computer program “WILDLIFE”; the culmination of the latest advances in artificial intelligence and biotechnology; hers is a journey that will span across decades around the globe. Kelly’s novel is a most memorable exploration into what it really means to be human, told in a fast-paced style of luminous, descriptive prose demonstrating that Kelly isn’t just a cyberpunk fiction writer possessed with notable ideas, but also one who must rank as among science fiction’s most important prose stylists. Without question, “Wildlife” should be viewed as required reading for those interested in cyberpunk and post-cyberpunk science fiction demonstrating that Kelly isn’t just a cyberpunk fiction writer possessed with notable ideas, but also one who must rank as among science fiction’s most important prose stylists.
 -from John Kwok’s review on Amazon.com

Wildlife (1995)

by James Patrick Kelly

The last great cyberpunk science fiction novel, James Patrick Kelly’s “Wildlife” is a compelling, memorable, exploration into the future of computers and biotechnology and its unforeseen impact on humanity. Covering three generations of the Wynne family, “Wildlife” still seems prophetic in its fictional coverage of biotechnology and artificial intelligence, in a dark, nightmarish future far more realistic than anything I have read in recently-published post-cyberpunk novels. Kelly’s Wynne Edwards is one of cyberpunk’s most fascinating protagonists; the product of an odd experiment conducted by her father, Tony Cage, the most famous and wealthiest designer drug artist. She must contend with the unexpected future shaped by the release of the computer program “WILDLIFE”; the culmination of the latest advances in artificial intelligence and biotechnology; hers is a journey that will span across decades around the globe. Kelly’s novel is a most memorable exploration into what it really means to be human, told in a fast-paced style of luminous, descriptive prose demonstrating that Kelly isn’t just a cyberpunk fiction writer possessed with notable ideas, but also one who must rank as among science fiction’s most important prose stylists. Without question, “Wildlife” should be viewed as required reading for those interested in cyberpunk and post-cyberpunk science fiction demonstrating that Kelly isn’t just a cyberpunk fiction writer possessed with notable ideas, but also one who must rank as among science fiction’s most important prose stylists.

 -from John Kwok’s review on Amazon.com

September142014

Kickstarting a fund to translate and publish Chinese sf in English

mostlysignssomeportents:

image

Neil Clarke from the Hugo-winning Clarkesworld writes, “Clarkesworld Magazine has entered into an agreement with Storycom International in China to locate, translate, and publish Chinese science fiction stories in every issue.”


Read more…

11AM

cinemagorgeous:

Beautiful sci-fi art by Simon Fetscher.

September132014
10AM

Just in case

You don’t want to see the art and only want the books, you can always go here

http://sciencefictionreader.tumblr.com/tagged/books

I try to post new book recs on Mondays. If the book is a reblog on another day, there is a 50/50 chance I just thought the cover was interesting art and I know nothing about the book.

September122014
September112014
September102014

When Vernor Vinge coined the term technological singularity few foresaw it becoming the conceptual watershed that it is now.
Today, regardless of whether you are writing about sci fi, futurism, artificial intelligence, technology or the future of humanity, the moment you embrace the longer-term big picture framework of reference is the moment you are writing about the singularity. And if that is not the case, then, you must justify why not. So, in a way, you are still writing about the singularity.

Thanks to Josh Calder, who made the effort to dig out and scan the original article, I can now show you a copy of the actual page where the term was used for the very first time in its contemporary technological context: the January 1983 issue of Omni magazine.

When Vernor Vinge Coined the Technological Singularity

When Vernor Vinge coined the term technological singularity few foresaw it becoming the conceptual watershed that it is now.

Today, regardless of whether you are writing about sci fi, futurism, artificial intelligence, technology or the future of humanity, the moment you embrace the longer-term big picture framework of reference is the moment you are writing about the singularity. And if that is not the case, then, you must justify why not. So, in a way, you are still writing about the singularity.

Thanks to Josh Calder, who made the effort to dig out and scan the original article, I can now show you a copy of the actual page where the term was used for the very first time in its contemporary technological context: the January 1983 issue of Omni magazine.

When Vernor Vinge Coined the Technological Singularity

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